• Sessions: 1
    Class Date(s): 06-16-2021 to 06-16-2021
    Day(s) of the week: Wednesday
    Time: 1:00 PM → 2:00 PM
    Instructor: Mark Carlson, Historian & Author
    Term: 2021-2
    Location: Online Class

    The assassination of Abraham Lincoln brought to a close the bloodiest war in American history. But even now, more than 150 years later, it is still the subject of endless speculation and controversy. Recent publications have “exposed” a “major government conspiracy to allow the assassination and cover it up,” but this is one time where the truth is... read more
    The assassination of Abraham Lincoln brought to a close the bloodiest war in American history. But even now, more than 150 years later, it is still the subject of endless speculation and controversy. Recent publications have “exposed” a “major government conspiracy to allow the assassination and cover it up,” but this is one time where the truth is just as compelling. John Wilkes Booth worked almost totally alone in his zeal to kill Lincoln. The men who planned and executed his insane plot were not a well-organized, highly trained group of patriots backed by a deposed government, but a tiny band of malcontents, drunks and feeble sycophants. With archival photos and maps, Mark Carlson will tell you how and why Booth really killed Abraham Lincoln.
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  • Sessions: 1
    Class Date(s): 06-02-2021 to 06-02-2021
    Day(s) of the week: Wednesday
    Time: 4:00 PM → 5:00 PM
    Instructor: Larry Solomon, PhD
    Term: 2021-2
    Location: Online Class

    The general consensus today is that our society is psychologically polarized regarding political issues. And the polarization is extreme. Unabashed partisan attacks are hurled across the congressional aisle with neither embarrassment nor reproach. Are there mental processes that could lead to reconciliation, collaboration and bipartisanship? We will explore... read more
    The general consensus today is that our society is psychologically polarized regarding political issues. And the polarization is extreme. Unabashed partisan attacks are hurled across the congressional aisle with neither embarrassment nor reproach. Are there mental processes that could lead to reconciliation, collaboration and bipartisanship? We will explore this possibility and suggest an approach that might help people heal the rift currently plaguing our political system.
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  • Sessions: 1
    Class Date(s): 06-04-2021 to 06-04-2021
    Day(s) of the week: Friday
    Time: 2:00 PM → 3:00 PM
    Instructor: Matthew Wion, PhD, Professor of Philosophy
    Term: 2021-2
    Location: Online Class

    There are many who think that the meaning of life is to be happy. But there is some research that suggests not only that this is not true, but that in the long run, we desire meaning over happiness. We will examine what happiness means and whether a meaningful life is identical to a happy life or... read more
    There are many who think that the meaning of life is to be happy. But there is some research that suggests not only that this is not true, but that in the long run, we desire meaning over happiness. We will examine what happiness means and whether a meaningful life is identical to a happy life or not.
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  • Sessions: 1
    Class Date(s): 06-09-2021 to 06-09-2021
    Day(s) of the week: Wednesday
    Time: 4:00 PM → 5:00 PM
    Instructor: Julia Fister, MA, Studio ACE Executive Director
    Term: 2021-2
    Location: Online Class

    Recognized as the “father of us all” by Picasso and Matisse, the works of Paul Cezanne challenged and inspired his contemporaries. Best known for Post-Impressionist paintings, Cezanne used easily recognizable brushstrokes and planes of color in his study of subjects. This lecture will explore the life and work of Paul Cezanne who, among his many... read more
    Recognized as the “father of us all” by Picasso and Matisse, the works of Paul Cezanne challenged and inspired his contemporaries. Best known for Post-Impressionist paintings, Cezanne used easily recognizable brushstrokes and planes of color in his study of subjects. This lecture will explore the life and work of Paul Cezanne who, among his many accomplishments, is said to have formed the bridge between 19th century Impressionism and 20th century Cubism.
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  • Sessions: 1
    Class Date(s): 06-10-2021 to 06-10-2021
    Day(s) of the week: Thursday
    Time: 4:00 PM → 5:00 PM
    Instructor: Gwenyth Mapes, Professor of Humanities
    Term: 2021-2
    Location: Online Class

    Europe’s Enlightenment is critiqued by the emerging Romantic era (early 1800’s), producing a change from Neoclassical art to an entirely new style of art which focuses on emotions in both the color use and themes. Called “bad” and even “degenerate” art in its day, Romantic art led to the later Impressionist, Expressionist, and modern art of the... read more
    Europe’s Enlightenment is critiqued by the emerging Romantic era (early 1800’s), producing a change from Neoclassical art to an entirely new style of art which focuses on emotions in both the color use and themes. Called “bad” and even “degenerate” art in its day, Romantic art led to the later Impressionist, Expressionist, and modern art of the future.
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  • Sessions: 1
    Class Date(s): 06-04-2021 to 06-04-2021
    Day(s) of the week: Friday
    Time: 2:00 PM → 3:00 PM
    Instructor: Rudy Shappee, U.S. Navy Veteran and Local Historian
    Term: 2021-2
    Location: Online Class

    Join historian Rudy Shappee as he presents the details of what military historian John Keegan called “the most stunning blow in the history of naval warfare.” Learn why Japanese  Admiral Yamamoto thought the occupation of tiny Midway Atoll located in the Central Pacific Ocean was the key in defeating the United States during World War II, and how a... read more
    Join historian Rudy Shappee as he presents the details of what military historian John Keegan called “the most stunning blow in the history of naval warfare.” Learn why Japanese  Admiral Yamamoto thought the occupation of tiny Midway Atoll located in the Central Pacific Ocean was the key in defeating the United States during World War II, and how a small, under-gunned U.S. fleet brought the Japanese to their knees.
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  • Sessions: 2
    Class Date(s): 06-14-2021 to 06-15-2021
    Day(s) of the week: Monday, Tuesday
    Time: 4:00 PM → 5:00 PM
    Instructor: Henry George, Engineer, Archaeologist and Geologist
    Term: 2021-2
    Location: Online Class

    Part 1 – Astrophysics The Story of the Earth begins with the “Big Bang” 13.7 billion years ago.  From a volume less than one atom, all the matter in the universe was created.  Billions of stars in billions of galaxies came into existence in milliseconds.  Then in several cycles of birth to death of individual stars; elements, molecules,... read more
    Part 1 – Astrophysics The Story of the Earth begins with the “Big Bang” 13.7 billion years ago.  From a volume less than one atom, all the matter in the universe was created.  Billions of stars in billions of galaxies came into existence in milliseconds.  Then in several cycles of birth to death of individual stars; elements, molecules, minerals, and rocks became part of our universe.  From the detritus of a supernova, the exploding death of a star, our own solar system and our planet came in to existence 4.5 billion years ago.   Learn how this story of astrophysics set the stage for the story of our planet, Earth. Part II — The Eons of Earth Most of the historical geology that earth science majors study in college covers only the last half billion years of Earth’s history.    This lecture will review the origins of the Earth and its subsequent development to our present time.  New technology and recent research have uncovered information that was unavailable to earth scientists in the past.  The birth of the Earth (and the Moon) and the four eons of Earth’s history will be discussed as Earth evolved from molten ball of magma to the present biosphere that we live on today.
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  • Sessions: 1
    Class Date(s): 06-16-2021 to 06-16-2021
    Day(s) of the week: Wednesday
    Time: 4:00 PM → 5:00 PM
    Instructor: Larry Solomon, PhD
    Term: 2021-2
    Location: Online Class

    After looking at some ancient wisdom about “happiness” as well as a dictionary definition, we will explore some of the current thinking on the subject. Current theories of the “Happiness Treadmill” and the “Happiness Set-Point” are reviewed. Drawing the field of Positive Psychology, “Well-Being Theory” and its five components are identified.... read more
    After looking at some ancient wisdom about “happiness” as well as a dictionary definition, we will explore some of the current thinking on the subject. Current theories of the “Happiness Treadmill” and the “Happiness Set-Point” are reviewed. Drawing the field of Positive Psychology, “Well-Being Theory” and its five components are identified. Suggestions for fostering Well-Being are presented. Additionally, a web-site is provided where one can measure one’s own level of “happiness.”
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  • Sessions: 2
    Class Date(s): 05-07-2021 to 06-04-2021
    Day(s) of the week: Friday
    Time: 02:00 PM → 03:00 PM
    Instructor: Sheila Griffith, Program Manager, Alzheimer's Association National Capital Area Chapter
    Term: 2021-2
    Location: Online Class
    REGISTRATION CLOSED
    Are you or a loved one experiencing issues with memory loss or other cognitive impairment? Do you have trouble with your daily activities? Join us on the first Friday of each month for a fun and social way for you to meet and spend time with others experiencing a similar journey. You are not alone. Meeting dates are: May 7 and June 4. Limit:... read more
    Are you or a loved one experiencing issues with memory loss or other cognitive impairment? Do you have trouble with your daily activities? Join us on the first Friday of each month for a fun and social way for you to meet and spend time with others experiencing a similar journey. You are not alone. Meeting dates are: May 7 and June 4. Limit: 18
  • Sessions: 1
    Class Date(s): 05-25-2021 to 05-25-2021
    Day(s) of the week: Tuesday
    Time: 03:00 PM → 04:30 PM
    Instructor: Jonina Duker, Certified Book Discussion Leader
    Term: 2021-2
    Location: Online Class

    Richard the III of the House of Plantagenet – did he or didn’t he?  Shakespeare thought that Richard III did murder his nephews in the tower.  Read this historical fiction/detective novel to find out what author Josephine Tey... read more
    Richard the III of the House of Plantagenet – did he or didn’t he?  Shakespeare thought that Richard III did murder his nephews in the tower.  Read this historical fiction/detective novel to find out what author Josephine Tey thought.
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